Commercial landlords and tenants are preparing to safeguard their employees and customers from COVID-19 risks. Thermal cameras to measure temperatures, facial recognition, Bluetooth, Wi-Fi, and GPS are all being leveraged to track and trace the contagion. We can help. The attached checklist provides information regarding privacy notice requirements as well as security controls necessary to avoid privacy pitfalls.

The California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) went into effect three months ago, on January 1, 2020. Although enforcement by the California attorney general cannot begin until July 1, private plaintiffs have been able to bring claims under the law’s limited private right of action since the beginning of the year.

The CCPA is already having an impact on litigation. Two high-profile cases filed after January 1 directly allege violations of the CCPA and have attracted attention. Other cases that either allege CCPA violations or otherwise cite to the statute have received less notice. Even if the cases do not result in decisions that are binding on future litigants, the arguments are worth a look because they may signal trends for which privacy litigators should be prepared. To that end, this privacy quick tip aims to paint a broader picture of how the CCPA has been referenced in litigation and identify a few potential trends to keep an eye on. Continue Reading CCPA in Litigation: 2018 to Present

COVID-19 arrives just as the first omnibus privacy statute in the United States, the CCPA became effective. Since its January 1 effective date, we continue to wait for finalization of the CCPA regulations and enforcement that was slated for July 1. In a pandemic environment, companies, employers, and public institutions are grappling, outside the HIPAA context, with unique privacy, data security, and cybersecurity implications of their responses to the coronavirus. From a compliance perspective, businesses are considering under what circumstances they can disclose consumer or employee health conditions or geolocation information in the service of greater public health. Other companies —and governmental institutions at every level—are confronting the very real, and often opportunistic threats to data security posed by aggressive thieves who use crises as cover to commit an assortment of cybercrimes. Privacy and security requirements vary by jurisdiction, so businesses should be mindful of potentially divergent and overlapping approaches and responsibilities as the situation continues to evolve.

We offer a few updates and practical tips for best practices to promote compliance with privacy and data security requirements.

Continue Reading CCPA & COVID-19: A Practical Guide to Addressing Privacy and Data Security Implications of the Coronavirus

On March 11, 2020, the California Attorney General published its second modification to the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) proposed regulations (“Second Modified Proposed Regs”). The redline includes the Second Modification language in blue and green as well as the first modification edits that were issued on February 10, 2020 (“First Modified Proposed Regs”). Collectively, the First Modified Proposed Regs and the Second Modified Proposed Regs are referred to below as the “Modified Proposed Regs.” The redlined comparison between the originally proposed regulations and the Modified Proposed Regs can be found here. All citations below are to the Modified Proposed Regs posted on March 11, 2020.  In addition to changes to the regulations, the Attorney General added supporting documents and information, which can be found here.

Continue Reading Updated: Modifications to Proposed CCPA Regulations: 10 Take-Aways

The California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018 (CCPA) is a sweeping new privacy statute that grants rights to consumers and imposes corresponding obligations on subject businesses. The CCPA defines consumers to mean California residents, and generally defines “business” as for-profit entities that meet certain threshold requirements. Cal. Civ. Code § 1798.140(g) (consumer), (c) (business). The CCPA went into effect on January 1, 2020. Continue Reading Business Solutions for CCPA Compliance

The California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) officially went into effect on January 1, 2020. For a full discussion of how the CCPA and the Attorney General’s proposed regulations will impact businesses, see here. To comply with the law, businesses must implement technical solutions to the CCPA’s various notice, submission, verification, and opt-out of sale requirements. Here are a few technical updates to facilitate compliance with the CCPA. Continue Reading The CCPA Is Live: Here Are the Technical Updates You Can Make to Comply

On October 10, 2019, the California attorney general’s office released the long-awaited proposed regulations to the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA), which can be found here. The regulations are detailed and cover a lot of ground with respect to notice to consumers, handling and verifying consumer requests, rules regarding minors, and non-discrimination. Continue Reading The CCPA Proposed Regulations Are Finally Here

On Friday the 13th of September 2019—the last day of California’s Legislative Session—California lawmakers updated, finalized and sent six bills that would amend the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) to Governor Newsom’s desk for signature. Despite months of efforts from various groups, the CCPA made it through the legislative session with relatively fewer changes than expected.

This update provides a brief overview of the six bills that made it out of both houses and how they will amend the CCPA. Read the full update here.

The CCPA grants consumers the right to request deletion of any personal information which a business has collected from the consumer. Cal. Civ. Code § 1798.105. It also requires a business to fulfill deletion requests, and to direct service providers to do the same, within 45 days of receiving a “verified” or “verifiable” request from the consumer. Cal. Civ. Code § 1798.140(y).

Continue Reading CCPA 12-Month Compliance Series Part 6: Retaining and Deleting Data

As we approach the California Consumer Privacy Act’s (CCPA) effective date of January 1, 2020, brick-and-mortar businesses that increasingly engage with consumers online will have to begin their compliance efforts. However, two challenges unique to brick-and-mortar businesses might hamper these efforts: (1) providing required disclosures to consumers before or at the point of data collection; and (2) knowing your data in a multi-channel environment.

The CCPA requires businesses to give consumers notice of their rights and/or data collection practices on three separate occasions: (1) in the online privacy policy [section 1798.130(a)(5)]; (2) “at or before the point of collection” [section 1798.100(b)]; and (3) in response to a verifiable consumer request. The later business obligation is straight forward. But providing privacy notices at or before the point of collection might be challenging for brick-and-mortar businesses.

Continue Reading Compliance Challenges for Brick-and-Mortars Under the CCPA