A business that is subject to the CCPA will need to update its consumer-facing online privacy policy. At a bare minimum, a privacy policy (and any California-specific privacy disclosure) must disclose:

  • A description of a consumer’s right to disclosure regarding the personal information (“PI”) that the business has collected about the consumer, a consumer’s right to disclosure regarding the business’s sale of her or his PI, and a consumer’s right not to be discriminated against for exercising any rights under the CCPA [Cal. Civ. Code §1798.130(a)(5)(A)];
  • Categories of PI collected, sold, or disclosed in the preceding 12 months [Cal. Civ. Code §1798.130(a)(5)(B)&(C)]; and
  • Two or more designated methods for submitting consumer requests, including a toll-free number and a website address [Cal. Civ. Code §1798.130(a)(1)].

Continue Reading CCPA 12-Month Compliance Series Part 4: Update Your Privacy Policy

It is no secret that artificial intelligence (“AI”) is set to become the next wave in technological innovation. AI is expected to create as many as 133 million new jobs by 2022 and boost the global economy by $13 trillion by 2030. However, successful machine learning depends on large and broad data sets, including personal information, and the extraordinary pace of development is forcing nations to reevaluate their laws in order to compete within the industry. Continue Reading Promoting and Regulating Artificial Intelligence

On April 9, 2019, the California Senate Judiciary committee voted to advance SB 561, which would expand the private right of action to any violation of the CCPA (not just for negligent breaches) and would eliminate a business’s 30-day right to cure. (Video available here.) During the hearing, several senators expressed serious concerns with the bill as currently drafted and made clear they expect to see changes to the bill or will not vote to move the bill forward. The bill will next be heard by the appropriations committee, followed by a Senate floor vote, before it moves on to the House. Continue Reading Takeaways from CA Senate Judiciary Hearing on Bill That Would Expand CCPA’s Private Right of Action

When creating a privacy program, it is important to look ahead and think strategically about who your audience might be. For businesses that might find themselves under the scrutiny of regulators and judges because of a lawsuit, unwanted publicity, or data breach, it is critical to be able to demonstrate substantial compliance for the program they’ve implemented. This can be accomplished by developing privacy programs that follow guidance promulgated by their audience—regulators and courts. This guidance includes the CNIL’s (the French Data Protection Authority’s) Six Steps for GDPR Compliance, along with Federal Trade Commission orders such as the Vizio 2017 order, which provide a roadmap for a comprehensive privacy program that can be distilled down to six main phases Continue Reading Six Phases of Compliance for a Comprehensive Privacy Program

After conducting a data inventory (see Part 2 of our CCPA series), a business should assess its risks by benchmarking its policies and practices with applicable privacy laws and regulations. Conducting a gap analysis is a critical tool in identifying compliance gaps and developing a plan to bridge those gaps. See e.g.Stipulated Order for Permanent Injunction and Monetary Judgment, Federal Trade Commission & Others v. Vizio, Inc., No. 2:17-cv-00758 (D.N.J. Feb. 6, 2017), Document 1-3 at 5 (privacy program includes addressing privacy risks related to the development and management of new and existing products and services) and CNIL (the French Data Protection Authority) Guidance on Six Steps for GDPR Compliance (step three to identify actions to comply with current/future obligations and to prioritize such actions based on risks). Continue Reading CCPA 12-Month Compliance Series Part 3: Conduct a Gap Analysis

The GDPR and the CCPA have made headlines for their wide scope and impact on privacy practices. On the issue of data security, they take somewhat different approaches, but the bottom line for companies is quite similar: data security measures tailored to the company’s risk profile and actual practices are essential for both legal compliance and the protection of the company and its customers.

The GDPR makes data security a general obligation for all companies processing personal data from the European Union (EU) by requiring controllers and processors to implement “appropriate technical and organizational measures to ensure a level of security appropriate to the risk” (Article 32). As stated in the GDPR, such measures include: pseudonymization and encryption; ability to ensure the ongoing confidentiality, integrity, availability, and resilience of systems and services; ability to timely restore availability and access to personal data in the event of a physical or technical incident; and processes for regularly testing, assessing, and evaluating the technical and organizational measures to ensure the security of processing. Comprehensive internal policies and procedures are thus crucial for all companies controlling or processing EU personal data. Recent enforcement brings home this point, as the Portuguese supervisory authority (CNPD) fined a hospital for using software that provided inadequate patient protections, even though the hospital asserted that it used the software provided by the Portuguese Health Ministry. Continue Reading Cybersecurity, GDPR, and CCPA

I wanted to take this opportunity to share the key takeaways from yesterday’s Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on The State of Data Privacy Protection: Exploring the California Consumer Protection Act and its European Counterpart (see video), where I presented my thoughts regarding a path forward for data management that involves transforming our view of data and reimagining data as a pre-tangible asset in this post-data world. Here are my takeaways from the hearing: Continue Reading CCPA- Key Takeaways from the California State Senate Judiciary Informational Hearing on the State of Data Privacy Protection: Exploring the California Consumer Protection Act and its European Counterpart

To comply with the CCPA, you need to know your data. You need to know what personal information you collect, where it is collected and stored, and whether, to whom, and for what purpose, it is shared or sold. And to know your data, you need to conduct a thorough data inventory.

The process of creating and maintaining a data inventory differs from company to company; however, several key steps are common across industries. First, you need to identify all personal information your company is collecting and where, or from whom, such information is obtained. You also need to identify where the personal information is stored and whether it is shared or sold to others. If personal information is shared with or sold to others, you need to know to whom and for what purpose. In addition, the inventory should have a mechanism to track the 12-month “lookback” period for responding to consumer data requests. If you had prepared a data inventory for GDPR, that would be helpful, but it would not be the end-all for CCPA compliance, as GDPR inventories (or Article 30 reports) are typically limited to personal information flowing from the European Union and to the data elements contained within GDPR’s definition of “personal data.” Continue Reading CCPA 12-Month Compliance Series Part 2: Know Your Data

On February 20, 2019, the Privacy & Consumer Protection Committee of the California State Assembly held an informational hearing where panelists representing different interests spoke on changes and clarifications to the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA). Panelists included Alastair Mactaggart, the founder of the ballot initiative of the bill, Stacey Schesser of the California Attorney General’s Office (AGO), Sarah Boot from the California Chamber of Commerce, as well as other interested parties including industry representatives, attorneys, consumer privacy advocates and professors.

Assembly member Ed Chau opened the hearing by noting that even with the passage of SB 1121, which amended the CCPA, there is more work to be done and more “cleanup” bills expected. Assembly member Chau emphasized that the law should be refined so that it is true to its legislative intent and workable for both consumers and businesses. Continue Reading CCPA Hearing and New Bills

For any company handling personal information (PI), an incident involving unauthorized access of the PI may be a question of when and not if. The question then becomes: what does the company need to do? Having an incident response plan that outlines the roles and responsibilities of company stakeholders, the steps the company will take in response to an incident, and the issues it must consider is essential to re-securing the network, meeting the legal obligations arising out of the incident, and minimizing the monetary and reputational harm to the company. All 50 states have breach notification laws that require businesses to take certain actions in the event of a data breach. While notification laws vary from state to state, most states require notification without unreasonable delay and are starting to impose deadlines as short as 30 days. Meanwhile, the GDPR requires a controller to notify “without undue delay” a data breach to the supervisory authority within 72 hours, and if the breach is likely to pose a “high risk to the rights and freedoms” of individuals, it must also notify the affected individuals. Continue Reading Incident Response: Have a Plan